Living with Arthritis: Grip without the Gripe

According to the Arthritis Foundation people with Osteoarthritis can and should be exercising. The benefits outweigh the risks if you are smart about it.  Multiple studies show that 30-45 min of mild to moderate low impact exercise done 3 to 4 times per week helps to improve and maintain the flexibility and motion in our … Continue reading “Living with Arthritis: Grip without the Gripe”

According to the Arthritis Foundation people with Osteoarthritis can and should be exercising. The benefits outweigh the risks if you are smart about it.  Multiple studies show that 30-45 min of mild to moderate low impact exercise done 3 to 4 times per week helps to improve and maintain the flexibility and motion in our joints.  Light to moderate intensity exercise actually has a protective effect on joint cartilage. Higher impact activities don’t necessarily need to be avoided but just done less frequently, with appropriate shoe wear, and avoiding harder surfaces.

How is Osteoarthritis treated?  American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) states, the best way to treat Osteoarthritis is early intervention through a well-designed exercise program by a health professional.  Your Physical Therapist is the ideal exercise and movement specialist to set up an exercise routine for you. The AOSSM along with the Arthritis Foundation and the American Physical Therapy Association recommend an exercise regime that includes the following components:

  • Range of motion or flexibility exercises. Gentle stretching and movement exercises keep the joints lubricated and muscles flexible.
  • Strengthening exercises. Improving muscle strength helps to protect and support our joints. Strengthening can be done on land or in the water. 
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises. Walking, bicycling and swimming help to improve stamina and lessen fatigue while also burning calories which help to reduce weight that can stress our joints.

Who is at Risk?

  • Older population. Risk increases as we age.
  • Women more than men, though it isn’t clear why.
  • Obesity. Being overweight adds extra stress to our hips and knees but also fat tissue has been shown to produce proteins that causes joint inflammation.  
  • Previous joint injuries from sports, accidents, even injuries that happened years ago add risk as we get older.
  • Genetics. There is a tendency to develop osteoarthritis if we have other family members who have it.
  • Certain occupations that put repetitive stress on our joints may lead to joint injury later in life.
  • Bone deformities. If you are born with defective cartilage or malformed joints this will put you at risk as you get older.

Osteoarthritis is a progressive degenerative disease. It comes on slowly but once symptomatic can be quite painful, can severely limit your daily activities, and prevent you from doing the things you love to do.  The key to prevention is early intervention. Early intervention means maintaining an active lifestyle. Ask your Physical Therapist about designing an exercise program that fits your needs, wants and lifestyle. Remember, it’s never too late to start protecting your joints!  

For more information please contact IPT at 619-260-0750 or speak with your IPT Therapist at your next visit!

Stay tuned for our video email on exercises specifically designed for osteoarthritis.

 

 

Core Muscle Strengthening with Swiss Ball

To better understand the importance of core strength, it is important to understand what the core is and how it functions. The “core” as it is commonly called, consists of a group of both superficial and deep muscles that surround and stabilize the lumbopelvic-hip complex. The deep muscles include the internal oblique, transversus abdominis, diaphragm, … Continue reading “Core Muscle Strengthening with Swiss Ball”

To better understand the importance of core strength, it is important to understand what the core is and how it functions. The “core” as it is commonly called, consists of a group of both superficial and deep muscles that surround and stabilize the lumbopelvic-hip complex. The deep muscles include the internal oblique, transversus abdominis, diaphragm, and pelvic floor, superficial muscles include rectus abdominis, external oblique, erector spinae, latissimus dorsi, and gluteus maximus. Core muscles are responsible for enhancing stability of the trunk and allowing for a more stable base in which you can move your limbs on. The stability is achieved through core muscle contraction, which compresses and stiffens the spine, thereby acting as guy wires decreasing injury risk and enhancing performance.

     

Core muscle strength and coordination is vital for many functional and athletic activities. Therefore, strengthening of the core should be completed as part of any regular exercise program. Given its simplicity and effectiveness, the use of Swiss ball training for core muscle development has gained popularity over the past several years. Swiss ball training does not require any sophisticated machines, it’s easy to learn and perform the exercises, and the ball can be taken just about anywhere. Performing exercises on the Swiss ball requires constant muscle recruitment from multiple muscles enhancing co-contraction and therefore core stability. Stronger core can help protect your low back, decrease back pain, and promote better posture.

Please consult your Physical Therapist with any questions regarding core strengthening and conditioning.

Corrective Exercise Fitness with Rachel Owen @ IPT

Who is it for?   Corrective exercise is designed to accommodate individuals with specific muscle imbalances and previous injuries. This one on one training will help to ensure proper form and technique are being followed throughout your program.  Your personalized program would include self-myofascial release such as foam rolling and static stretching. The sessions will also … Continue reading “Corrective Exercise Fitness with Rachel Owen @ IPT”

Who is it for?

 

Corrective exercise is designed to accommodate individuals with specific muscle imbalances and previous injuries. This one on one training will help to ensure proper form and technique are being followed throughout your program.  Your personalized program would include self-myofascial release such as foam rolling and static stretching. The sessions will also focus on activating under-active muscles with isolated strengthening before integrating dynamic movements into your routine.

Together your CES and your physical therapist will collaborate to develop a training program designed to consider your individual prior injuries and weaknesses as well as what can be addressed to help prevent future injuries in your daily environment.  

Why is this important to me?

  

Research articles released by the Center of Disease Control (CDC) stress that Americans of all ages are encouraged to participate in physical activity daily. Evidence recommends for adults to participate in at least two days a week of a muscle-strengthening activity (1). More research according to the CDC shows that adults are becoming less physically active in their daily lives (2). With the development of technology, gardeners, housekeepers, etc. people are required to complete less physical activity in their daily lives. These are great conveniences to make our lives easier but also rob us of the daily physical activity our bodies need.

According to a study released by the UNC School of Medicine more than 80% of Americans will experience low back pain at some point in their lives (3). This shows that it is becoming more prevalent to experience musculoskeletal pain. Although there are numerous possible causes to create low back pain, this prevalence supports the concept that decreased physical activity may lead to muscular dysfunction and injury.

Check out our schedule to make an appointment with our Corrective Exercise Specialist, Rachel Owen and make a commitment to your health and fitness today!  Call the office @ 619-260-0750 to book today or online at www.innovativept.net

 

References

1.) https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/index.htm?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcancer%2Fdcpc%2Fprevention%2Fpolicies_practices%2Fphysical_activity%2Fguidelines.htm

2.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence of physical activity, including lifestyle activities among adults – United States, 2000-2001, Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003;764-769.

3.) http://www.med.unc.edu/www/newsarchive/2009/february/chronic-low-back-pain-on-the-rise-unc-study-finds-alarming-increase-in-prevalence