Video: Craniofacial Exercises for Head, Neck and Jaw Pain

Follow along with Dr. Lindy First, DPT and Dr. Monique Lassaga-Bishop, DPT as they demonstrate easy exercises to relieve craniofacial pain. At Home Exercises: Seated Butterfly- sit upright with feet on ground, tighten stomach, overlap hands and place behind your neck. tuck your chin, make a long neck and retract your head backwards. Squeeze shoulder … Continue reading “Video: Craniofacial Exercises for Head, Neck and Jaw Pain”

Follow along with Dr. Lindy First, DPT and Dr. Monique Lassaga-Bishop, DPT as they demonstrate easy exercises to relieve craniofacial pain.

At Home Exercises:

  1. Seated Butterfly- sit upright with feet on ground, tighten stomach, overlap hands and place behind your neck. tuck your chin, make a long neck and retract your head backwards. Squeeze shoulder blades and pull your elbows back as far as possible. hold for 10-15 seconds, repeat 2x every hour building up to 1 minute over 6 weeks.
  2. Self Masseter Release- locate the bone by your ear, your TMJ and move fingers down 1/2 inch to your masseter muscle, find the belly of that muscle and make small circles on your face for 2 minutes. 2x throughout the day
  3. Self Temporalis Release- locate again your TMJ bone and go up about 1/2 to your temporal muscle. Make small circles on this area for 2 minutes. 2x throughout the day

REDUCE= Muscle Tension & Pain

PROMOTE= Overall Skeletal Health

RESULT = A Healthier You!

Benefits of Yoga

Yo·ga /ˈyōɡə/ noun Definition : a Hindu spiritual and ascetic discipline, a part of which, including breath control, simple meditation, and the adoption of specific bodily postures, is widely practiced for health and relaxation. The Benefits of Yoga Can reduce stress  A study done for the Journal of Affective Disorders showed that people who do … Continue reading “Benefits of Yoga”

Yo·ga
/ˈyōɡə/
noun
  • Can reduce stress 
    • A study done for the Journal of Affective Disorders showed that people who do yoga regularly have a reduced amount of cortisol (the stress hormone). 
  • Relieves Anxiety 
    • It emphasizes the importance of being present in the moment and finding a sense of peace, which could help treat anxiety.
  • Could improve heart health 
    • One study in the Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology  found that participants over 40 years of age who practiced yoga for five years had a lower blood pressure and pulse rate than those who didn’t
    • High blood pressure is one of the major causes of heart problems, such as heart attacks and stroke. Lowering your blood pressure can help reduce the risk of these problems
  • Could promote better sleep quality
    • Reduced cortisone levels and focus on breath may improve sleep 
  • Improves Flexibility and Balance
    • Although some poses and stretches may be difficult for a beginner, with time muscles stretch and flexibility improves. Its not uncommon for aches and pains to disappear when this happens, because tight muscles can cause unneeded stresses on joints. 
  • Increases strength 
    • Being able to maintain positions for extended amounts of time with the proper engaged muscles will improve strength throughout the body.

We have Adaptive Yoga and Pilates/Yoga at our Fitness Gym – Mondays @ 12:30pm and Wednesdays @ 12pm for Adaptive Yoga and Mondays and Wednesdays @ 3pm for Pilates Yoga. Ask your Physical Therapist which Yoga class would be right for you, and come try your first class on us!

Do you Have Chronic Face, Head and Neck Pain?

Craniofacial pain is a term used to describe any chronic facial, neck or head pain.  The most common forms of craniofacial pain are temporal mandibular joint dysfunction, trigeminal neuralgia and chronic headache disorder. Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD, aka TMJ) is pain or malfunction at the jaw joint. You may be more likely to get TMJ … Continue reading “Do you Have Chronic Face, Head and Neck Pain?”

Craniofacial pain is a term used to describe any chronic facial, neck or head pain.  The most common forms of craniofacial pain are temporal mandibular joint dysfunction, trigeminal neuralgia and chronic headache disorder.

Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD, aka TMJ) is pain or malfunction at the jaw joint. You may be more likely to get TMJ if you have rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, or fibromyalgia. Women are affected more often than men. Most people with TMJ are between the ages of 20 and 40.   TMJ symptoms can include clicking, locking of the jaw, headache, earache, phantom tooth pain and facial muscle fatigue.

Trigeminal neuralgia is an ongoing pain condition that affects certain nerves in your face. Women are more likely than men to get trigeminal neuralgia, and the disorder is more common in people older than 50.  Symptoms can include facial pain, difficulty in chewing, speaking, and brushing teeth.

Chronic headache disorder is a headache (Migraine, tension, or cluster) that occurs repeatedly. Tension-type headaches are the most common form of chronic headache disorder. A tension-type headache is generally described as a diffuse, mild to moderate pain or ache across the forehead, sides or back of your head or neck; a tight band-like feeling around your head; and sensitivity and/or tenderness of the scalp, neck and shoulders.   

Migraines like tension-type headaches are also a very common form of chronic headache disorder. See previous newsletter on migraines for more details regarding symptoms and treatment options.

Cluster headaches are the least common type of chronic headache disorder affecting less than 1 in 1,000 people.  This headache is of shorter duration but very painful, occurring daily for weeks or months at a time, then disappears completely to return without warning months or years later. Symptoms include severe pain in or around one eye that may radiate to your face, head, neck and shoulders; usually one-sided pain;  restlessness; excessive tearing and redness in your eye on the affected side; nose congestion or runniness on the affected side; forehead or facial sweating; pale skin or flushing of the face; and swelling around the eye or drooping of the eyelid on the affected side.

There are many causes of craniofacial pain.  Macro traumas, direct injury, to the face, jaw and neck that are caused by car accidents, sports injuries and accidental falls can result in craniofacial pain.  Micro traumas, indirect injury occurring over time, from stress, poor sitting and standing postures, chronic grinding and/or clenching of the teeth, and sleep disorders (sleep apnea, snoring) can cause the muscles that help to stabilize the head, neck, and/or jaw to be over worked and become fatigued resulting in craniofacial pain.

Airway – Sleep disorders like sleep apnea or or snoring

Bruxism -grinding of the teeth

Craniofacial pain – a result of both airway and bruxism

Whatever the cause or symptoms, craniofacial pain should not be taken lightly.  It can lead to depression, sleep deprivation, overuse of medication, and severely affect your activities of daily living.

If you are experiencing symptoms of craniofacial pain your physical therapist can help you determine the origin of your symptoms and initiate a treatment plan which would include manual therapy techniques to treat soft tissue and joint imbalances, modalities (ultrasound, electrical stimulation, cold laser) to decrease inflammation and exercises to improve your posture and head, neck and jaw alignment. 

For more information on craniofacial pain please contact us at 619.260.0750 today.