An Inside Look into IPT – Get to Know What We Do!

In honor of National Physical Therapy Month, take a sneak peek into the everyday activity of IPT and some of the many modalities used to help rehab, strengthen and support our patients and their everyday lives!

In honor of National Physical Therapy Month, take a sneak peek into the everyday activity of IPT and some of the many modalities used to help rehab, strengthen and support our patients and their everyday lives!

Why Physical Therapy Should be Your First Line of Defense

Seeing a PT first may lower a patient’s total cost of care, bypassing imaging scans, opioid prescriptions, and other therapies that could be unnecessary or even harmful. If you have experienced a soft-tissue injury, you may be a good candidate for receiving care directly from a physical therapist. A soft-tissue injury is an injury that … Continue reading “Why Physical Therapy Should be Your First Line of Defense”

Seeing a PT first may lower a patient’s total cost of care, bypassing imaging scans, opioid prescriptions, and other therapies that could be unnecessary or even harmful.

If you have experienced a soft-tissue injury, you may be a good candidate for receiving care directly from a physical therapist. A soft-tissue injury is an injury that does not affect the bone. These injuries affect muscles, tendons, ligaments and other soft tissues. 

Acute examples include:

  • Sprain
  • Strain
  • Swelling
  • Contusion / bruising

Soft-tissue injuries resulting from overuse may include:

  • Tendinitis
  • Bursitis
  • ArthritisImage result for benefits of physical therapy

You may be asking, how can PT work for me?

  • PT helps manage pain 
    • Doctor-prescribed opioids are appropriate in some cases, but they just mask the pain without addressing the cause of the pain. Opioid risks include depression, overdose, and addiction, plus withdrawal symptoms when stopping use.
  • PT can help avoid surgery 
    • While surgery is unavoidable in some cases, physical therapy can help avoid surgery for others. By eliminating pain, assisting with healing, and improving physical health, physical therapy can help heal injured tissue and facilitate mobility all on its own, thus eliminating the need to go under the knife
  • PT can help avoid further or future injury 
    • One of the key aspects of physical therapy involves assessing the weak areas in the patient’s body and formulating a PT plan that helps strengthen these vulnerable points. 
  • PT improves mobility and balance 
    • Therapeutic exercises can restore mobility, make walking and moving around safer, and can even improve coordination and balance in patients who are at high risk for falls.
  • PT can help with general health issues 
    • By increasing physical activity, you can also reduce your risk of other chronic diseases.
  • PT can help manage age-related issues 
    • One of the less obvious advantages of physical therapy is that it helps handle and manage many age-related health problems including joint pains, arthritis, and osteoporosis. PT is a safer and more conservative approach for older patients, as it gives them a less traumatic alternative than undergoing joint replacement surgery. 
  • PT can help maximize your movement
    • Physical therapists can identify, diagnose and treat movement related issues. Each treatment plan is custom designed for each person’s individual challenges and outcome goals. The benefit of physical therapy can help you live pain free and increase your quality of life.
  • PT can help manage diabetes and vascular conditions 
    • Physical therapy can help manage your blood sugar through exercise. The exercise mainly consists of the right mix of aerobic exercises and weight strengthening exercises.

Benefits of PT for athletes 

Physical therapists are movement specialists with extensive schooling in order to determine limitations or imbalances of joints. Seeing a PT as an athlete will give a certain edge to your performance and ensure you are working towards your peak potential, improving power, endurance, flexibility, range of motion, etc. 

Learn more about physical therapy and the many benefits, treatments and modalities we at Innovative Physical Therapy use today by asking one of our team members or calling in at 619.260.0750.

Written and researched by : Dr. Monique Lassaga-Bishop
Facts sourced from: www.slsportstherapy.com & www.movementforlife.com

The History of Physical Therapy

National Physical Therapy month is celebrated in October to recognize the impact physical therapy has had on the medical profession and to encourage community awareness on the benefits that physical therapy has on treating chronic or acute pain.   So how did the profession of physical therapy get started?   Little known is how far back in … Continue reading “The History of Physical Therapy”

National Physical Therapy month is celebrated in October to recognize the impact physical therapy has had on the medical profession and to encourage community awareness on the benefits that physical therapy has on treating chronic or acute pain.  

Physical therapists and physicians work together to treat children at a New England poliomyelitis clinic in 1916.

So how did the profession of physical therapy get started?  

Little known is how far back in history the idea of physical therapy goes.   There are documented records as early as 430 BC that Hippocrates recognized the benefits of massage, manual manipulation and water therapy for pain relief.  It wasn’t until much later towards the end of the 19th century with the establishment of orthopedics in medicine, the outbreak of polio  and with women recruited in WWI to restore function to injured soldiers, that modern day physical therapy as we know it was recognized as a profession.    

It is recorded that the Swedish scholar and fitness enthusiast, Per Hendrik Ling, is given credit for being the first to recognize physical therapy as a profession when he established the Royal Central Institute of Gymnastics in 1813 for manipulation and exercise.  He recognized the benefits exercise and manual manipulation had on restoring function and movement in people with disabilities. In 1887 the Swedish National Board of Health & Welfare was the first to register practitioners working in Ling’s institute as physical therapists.   

Other countries were soon to follow as they recognized the benefits of physical therapy.  In 1896, nurses in England formed the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. In 1913 New Zealand started one of the earliest schools of physical therapy at the University of Otago.  In 1914 a school for “Reconstructive Aides”, a term used for those practicing physical therapy was established in the United States at the Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington DC.   

As the profession continued to gain recognition, the first physical therapy research in the US was published in March of 1921.  That same year, the American Women’s Physical Therapeutic Association was established by American physical therapist Mary McMillan.  Due to her extensive contributions to the profession, Mary McMillan became known as the “Mother of Physical Therapy”. 

Mary McMillan, circa 1921

The demand for physical therapists became even greater during WWII and the polio epidemic during the 1940’s and 1950’s.   By late 1940’s, the physical therapy association changed its name to what is known today as the American Physical Therapy Association, or APTA. The goal of the APTA is to further advancements in physical therapy practice, research and education.  Current membership is over 100,000.

Reconstruction Aides treat soldiers at           Fort Sam Houstan, Texas, in 1919

The month of October is the time physical therapists across the country celebrate and encourage everyone to raise awareness of physical therapy as a cost-effective and safe alternative to medication and in many cases surgery.  According to the APTA, physical therapy is “a safer way to manage pain.”  

If you, a friend or family member is suffering from chronic or acute pain, recent or unresolved injury, please consult with your local physical therapist who will design a plan specific to your needs and goals. 

Written by : Marilyn Johnson PT, facts and references from : APTA and Wikipedia.