Take a Walk – The Benefits of a Walking Program

For some, being physically active can be a daunting, scary idea. However physical activity doesn’t have to mean running stairs or grunting at the gym at the squat rack. Starting a simple walking program can be a great way to start getting active. What are the health benefits of walking programs: Walking is a weight … Continue reading “Take a Walk – The Benefits of a Walking Program”

For some, being physically active can be a daunting, scary idea. However physical activity doesn’t have to mean running stairs or grunting at the gym at the squat rack. Starting a simple walking program can be a great way to start getting active.

What are the health benefits of walking programs:

  • Walking is a weight bearing activity! What does that mean? You carry your own body weight when you walk, which builds stronger bones and reduces your risk of developing a bone disease called Osteoporosis
  • Increased cardiovascular and pulmonary (heart and lung) fitness
  • Reduced risk of heart disease and stroke
  • Evidence shows that walking for just 10 minutes a day at a brisk pace reduces risk of heart disease
  • Improved management of conditions such as hypertension (high blood pressure), high cholesterol, joint and muscular pain or stiffness, and diabetes
  • Improved balance
  • increased muscle strength and endurance
  • Reduced body fat

Tips for making walking more fun:

  • Grab a friend
  • Walk your dog
  • Purchase a step counter
  • Walk to your favorite music

Living with Arthritis: Grip without the Gripe

According to the Arthritis Foundation people with Osteoarthritis can and should be exercising. The benefits outweigh the risks if you are smart about it.  Multiple studies show that 30-45 min of mild to moderate low impact exercise done 3 to 4 times per week helps to improve and maintain the flexibility and motion in our … Continue reading “Living with Arthritis: Grip without the Gripe”

According to the Arthritis Foundation people with Osteoarthritis can and should be exercising. The benefits outweigh the risks if you are smart about it.  Multiple studies show that 30-45 min of mild to moderate low impact exercise done 3 to 4 times per week helps to improve and maintain the flexibility and motion in our joints.  Light to moderate intensity exercise actually has a protective effect on joint cartilage. Higher impact activities don’t necessarily need to be avoided but just done less frequently, with appropriate shoe wear, and avoiding harder surfaces.

How is Osteoarthritis treated?  American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) states, the best way to treat Osteoarthritis is early intervention through a well-designed exercise program by a health professional.  Your Physical Therapist is the ideal exercise and movement specialist to set up an exercise routine for you. The AOSSM along with the Arthritis Foundation and the American Physical Therapy Association recommend an exercise regime that includes the following components:

  • Range of motion or flexibility exercises. Gentle stretching and movement exercises keep the joints lubricated and muscles flexible.
  • Strengthening exercises. Improving muscle strength helps to protect and support our joints. Strengthening can be done on land or in the water. 
  • Aerobic or endurance exercises. Walking, bicycling and swimming help to improve stamina and lessen fatigue while also burning calories which help to reduce weight that can stress our joints.

Who is at Risk?

  • Older population. Risk increases as we age.
  • Women more than men, though it isn’t clear why.
  • Obesity. Being overweight adds extra stress to our hips and knees but also fat tissue has been shown to produce proteins that causes joint inflammation.  
  • Previous joint injuries from sports, accidents, even injuries that happened years ago add risk as we get older.
  • Genetics. There is a tendency to develop osteoarthritis if we have other family members who have it.
  • Certain occupations that put repetitive stress on our joints may lead to joint injury later in life.
  • Bone deformities. If you are born with defective cartilage or malformed joints this will put you at risk as you get older.

Osteoarthritis is a progressive degenerative disease. It comes on slowly but once symptomatic can be quite painful, can severely limit your daily activities, and prevent you from doing the things you love to do.  The key to prevention is early intervention. Early intervention means maintaining an active lifestyle. Ask your Physical Therapist about designing an exercise program that fits your needs, wants and lifestyle. Remember, it’s never too late to start protecting your joints!  

For more information please contact IPT at 619-260-0750 or speak with your IPT Therapist at your next visit!

Stay tuned for our video email on exercises specifically designed for osteoarthritis.

 

 

Core Muscle Strengthening with Swiss Ball

To better understand the importance of core strength, it is important to understand what the core is and how it functions. The “core” as it is commonly called, consists of a group of both superficial and deep muscles that surround and stabilize the lumbopelvic-hip complex. The deep muscles include the internal oblique, transversus abdominis, diaphragm, … Continue reading “Core Muscle Strengthening with Swiss Ball”

To better understand the importance of core strength, it is important to understand what the core is and how it functions. The “core” as it is commonly called, consists of a group of both superficial and deep muscles that surround and stabilize the lumbopelvic-hip complex. The deep muscles include the internal oblique, transversus abdominis, diaphragm, and pelvic floor, superficial muscles include rectus abdominis, external oblique, erector spinae, latissimus dorsi, and gluteus maximus. Core muscles are responsible for enhancing stability of the trunk and allowing for a more stable base in which you can move your limbs on. The stability is achieved through core muscle contraction, which compresses and stiffens the spine, thereby acting as guy wires decreasing injury risk and enhancing performance.

     

Core muscle strength and coordination is vital for many functional and athletic activities. Therefore, strengthening of the core should be completed as part of any regular exercise program. Given its simplicity and effectiveness, the use of Swiss ball training for core muscle development has gained popularity over the past several years. Swiss ball training does not require any sophisticated machines, it’s easy to learn and perform the exercises, and the ball can be taken just about anywhere. Performing exercises on the Swiss ball requires constant muscle recruitment from multiple muscles enhancing co-contraction and therefore core stability. Stronger core can help protect your low back, decrease back pain, and promote better posture.

Please consult your Physical Therapist with any questions regarding core strengthening and conditioning.

Corrective Exercise Fitness with Rachel Owen @ IPT

Who is it for?   Corrective exercise is designed to accommodate individuals with specific muscle imbalances and previous injuries. This one on one training will help to ensure proper form and technique are being followed throughout your program.  Your personalized program would include self-myofascial release such as foam rolling and static stretching. The sessions will also … Continue reading “Corrective Exercise Fitness with Rachel Owen @ IPT”

Who is it for?

 

Corrective exercise is designed to accommodate individuals with specific muscle imbalances and previous injuries. This one on one training will help to ensure proper form and technique are being followed throughout your program.  Your personalized program would include self-myofascial release such as foam rolling and static stretching. The sessions will also focus on activating under-active muscles with isolated strengthening before integrating dynamic movements into your routine.

Together your CES and your physical therapist will collaborate to develop a training program designed to consider your individual prior injuries and weaknesses as well as what can be addressed to help prevent future injuries in your daily environment.  

Why is this important to me?

  

Research articles released by the Center of Disease Control (CDC) stress that Americans of all ages are encouraged to participate in physical activity daily. Evidence recommends for adults to participate in at least two days a week of a muscle-strengthening activity (1). More research according to the CDC shows that adults are becoming less physically active in their daily lives (2). With the development of technology, gardeners, housekeepers, etc. people are required to complete less physical activity in their daily lives. These are great conveniences to make our lives easier but also rob us of the daily physical activity our bodies need.

According to a study released by the UNC School of Medicine more than 80% of Americans will experience low back pain at some point in their lives (3). This shows that it is becoming more prevalent to experience musculoskeletal pain. Although there are numerous possible causes to create low back pain, this prevalence supports the concept that decreased physical activity may lead to muscular dysfunction and injury.

Check out our schedule to make an appointment with our Corrective Exercise Specialist, Rachel Owen and make a commitment to your health and fitness today!  Call the office @ 619-260-0750 to book today or online at www.innovativept.net

 

References

1.) https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/index.htm?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcancer%2Fdcpc%2Fprevention%2Fpolicies_practices%2Fphysical_activity%2Fguidelines.htm

2.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Prevalence of physical activity, including lifestyle activities among adults – United States, 2000-2001, Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep. 2003;764-769.

3.) http://www.med.unc.edu/www/newsarchive/2009/february/chronic-low-back-pain-on-the-rise-unc-study-finds-alarming-increase-in-prevalence

 

 

 

 

 

 

An Athlete’s Worst Nightmare – ACL Injury

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common ligament injuries in sports. More than 3% of athletes in a 4-year period of sporting activity sustain a rupture of the ACL and the risk is higher in female population. The incident rate is 200,000 cases/year in the USA. About half of all ACL … Continue reading “An Athlete’s Worst Nightmare – ACL Injury”

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury is one of the most common ligament injuries in sports. More than 3% of athletes in a 4-year period of sporting activity sustain a rupture of the ACL and the risk is higher in female population. The incident rate is 200,000 cases/year in the USA.

About half of all ACL injuries occur along with damage to other structures in the knee, such as articular cartilage, meniscus, or other ligaments. Injured ligaments are described as “sprains” and are graded on a severity scale.

Grade 1 – Ligament is mildly damaged but still able to help stabilize the knee

Grade 2 – Ligament stretches to the point where it becomes loose, often referred to as a partial tear of the ligament

Grade 3 – Most commonly referred to as a complete tear of the ligament

Most commonly the ACL is torn when changing directions rapidly, stopping suddenly, slowing down while running, landing from a jump incorrectly, or a collision to the side of the knee.  Common symptoms of a torn ACL include: “popping” sensation, immediate swelling, feeling of instability of the knee after injury, loss of full range of motion, discomfort with walking and changing directions.

Tore your ACL now what? A torn ACL will not heal on it’s own. Depending on your activity level and which activities you would want to perform, often you can function without surgical intervention. If return to cutting sports or high activity levels, surgical intervention is necessary. Physical therapy is a necessity if you chose non-surgical or surgical interventions to build strength and endurance to allow you to return to sport and other recreational activities.

For more information regarding ACL injuries and recovery process please call your doctor or speak to one of us at Innovative Physical Therapy.

Have You Tried Our Pilates Classes?

What is Pilates Pilates consists of moving through a slow, sustained series of exercises using abdominal control and proper breathing. The quality of each posture is more important than the number of repetitions or how energetically you can move. Health Benefits of Pilates Improved flexibility Increased muscle strength of your abdominal muscles, lower back, hips … Continue reading “Have You Tried Our Pilates Classes?”

What is Pilates

Pilates consists of moving through a slow, sustained series of exercises using abdominal control and proper breathing. The quality of each posture is more important than the number of repetitions or how energetically you can move.

Health Benefits of Pilates

  • Improved flexibility
  • Increased muscle strength of your abdominal muscles, lower back, hips and buttocks
  • Enhanced muscular control of your back and limbs
  • Improved stabilization of your spine
  • Improved posture
  • Rehabilitation or prevention of injuries related to muscle imbalances
  • Improved physical coordination and balance
  • Prevention of musculoskeletal injuries
  • Increased body awareness
  • Stress management and relaxation.

Types of Pilates

The two basic forms of Pilates are:

  • Mat-based Pilates – this is a series of exercises performed on the floor using gravity and your own body weight to provide resistance. The main aim is to condition the deeper, supporting muscles of your body to improve posture, balance and coordination

  • Equipment-based Pilates – this includes specific equipment that works against spring-loaded resistance, including the Reformer, which is a moveable carriage that you push and pull along its tracks. Some forms of Pilates include weights (such as dumbbells) and other types of small equipment that offer resistance to the muscles, as well as, proprioceptive feedback.

Pilates is suitable for everyone

The Pilates method is taught to suit each person and exercises are regularly re-evaluated to ensure they are appropriate for that person. Due to the individual attention, this method can suit everybody from elite athletes to people with limited mobility, pregnant women and people with low fitness levels.

Check out our mat Pilates classes offered daily or schedule a private Reformer session today!

Meet Two New Team IPT Members – Rachel and Katie!

Rachel K. Owen, Corrective Exercise Specialist and Lead Physical Therapy Aide Rachel has been support staff with Innovative Physical Therapy since 2015. She graduated from San Diego State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology with an emphasis in Pre-Physical Therapy.  Rachel has diverse fitness experience as a Stand-Up Paddle Board instructor and … Continue reading “Meet Two New Team IPT Members – Rachel and Katie!”

Rachel K. Owen, Corrective Exercise Specialist and Lead Physical Therapy Aide

Rachel has been support staff with Innovative Physical Therapy since 2015. She graduated from San Diego State University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology with an emphasis in Pre-Physical Therapy.  Rachel has diverse fitness experience as a Stand-Up Paddle Board instructor and personal trainer to clients with a variety of functional fitness levels. Her certifications also include CPR/AED and Waterfront Lifeguard.

Throughout her own experiences as a former patient of physical therapy for a Lumbar spine injury, she recognized her enthusiasm for health science, fitness, and wellness. This prompted her special interests to include functional fitness focusing on core and back strengthening, but she has also developed a passion for working with the elderly population as well. She utilizes a perfect combination of strengthening and stretching to create a personalized training program for the most effective course to reach clients’ goals and improve quality of life. She provides personalized attention, professional instruction, and her creative and dynamic personality also keeps exercises exciting.  

In her spare time you can find her hiking, golfing, enjoying yoga, biking, paddle boarding, or exploring the outdoors in San Diego from the beaches to the mountains.

Katie St. Louis CPT, RYT

Katie is a Certified Pilates Teacher and a Registered Yoga Teacher.  She grew up dancing as a child and teen in Ontario, Canada dancing both competitively and recreationally.  Katie was first introduced to both Yoga and Mat Pilates in her early 20’s and though no longer in the dance world, Katie found Pilates to be the continuation of the movement that her body craved while Yoga allowed the centering and mindfulness she desired.  Her passion for movement continued to evolve throughout the years and after moving to San Diego and starting a family, Katie decided to become fully certified in both fields to be able to take her own practice further.

In 2015 she was Certified through Club Pilates Comprehensive Pilates Teacher Training and in 2017 became certified in Vinyasa Yoga.  Katie teaches Mat Pilates, both Group and Private Reformer classes, Vinyasa and Hatha Yoga and is certified in TRX and Trigger Point fascial release, Barre Above, and Perinatal Corrective Exercise. Katie focuses on the mind-body connection and combines different modalities and techniques to help her clients reach their goals and feel like their best selves.  She takes pride in the lightbulb moments that she can watch her clients have and truly believes that movement heals, every day. Katie’s love for Pilates and Yoga have allowed her to help people improve their own and that is what matters most to her.

When Katie is not in the studio, you can find with her family at the beach, in one of San Diego’s newest restaurants or reading a good book in her backyard hammock.