Team IPT Favorite Holiday Recipes!

This is a special posting for December. With the holidays quickly approaching we wanted to share two of our favorite holiday recipes with you to get you in the spirit! Holiday butter ball cookies and holiday latkes! Holiday Butter Ball Cookies Ingredients: 1 cup butter 4 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 tsp vanilla 2  1/4 cups … Continue reading “Team IPT Favorite Holiday Recipes!”

This is a special posting for December. With the holidays quickly approaching we wanted to share two of our favorite holiday recipes with you to get you in the spirit! Holiday butter ball cookies and holiday latkes!

Holiday Butter Ball Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup butter

4 tablespoons powdered sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2  1/4 cups sifted flour

1 cup chopped nuts (pick your favorite!)

Directions: Cream butter, add sugar and continue to beat until light. Add vanilla, sifted flour and mix well. Fold in chopped nuts. Shape into balls on an un-greased cookie sheet. Bake in oven at 350 degrees for 15-18 minutes. Roll in confectioner’s sugar while hot!

 

Holiday Latkes

Ingredients:

2-3 peeled medium potatoes

1 large egg

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 tsp of salt, flour and cooking oil

2 medium size frying pans

Directions: Grate potatoes, squeeze out the starchy liquid. Mix in the whisked egg, chopped onion, 1 tsp of sale and 1 tsp of flour. Add enough canola/vegetable oil to fill entire bottom of the pan and then some. When oil is pipping hot, take one large tablespoon of mixture and place into the pan and smooth it out to become somewhat rounded (like a pancake!). Leave for two minutes or until golden brown on the bottom and flip to the other side. Place latkes on thick paper towel to cool and dab off extra oil. Serve with a side of applesauce or sour cream and enjoy!

Let’s Talk about Lower Back Pain

Lower. Back. Pain. We all know it, we’ve all experienced it and we all want it to go away. At any given time 25% of people living in the United States have lower back pain (LBP). That is a quarter of the country, A QUARTER! While most pain subsides and goes away within days, some … Continue reading “Let’s Talk about Lower Back Pain”

Lower. Back. Pain.

We all know it, we’ve all experienced it and we all want it to go away. At any given time 25% of people living in the United States have lower back pain (LBP). That is a quarter of the country, A QUARTER! While most pain subsides and goes away within days, some LBP can return or progress and can seriously impact your everyday life and your skeletal health.

A majority of us will be able to relieve and conquer our LBP by practicing simple exercises, maintaining great posture and staying active. But when chronic or recurring lower back pain happens, doing those exercises can become difficult. This is where Physical Therapy comes into play and can be the help someone needs to achieve comfort and  to prevent their lower back pain from coming back.

Physical Therapy will use three approaches for the treatment of lower back pain:

  1. Modalities
  2. Manual Therapy
  3. Active therapeutic exercises

Modalities commonly used:

  • Ultrasound – a form of deep heating where sound waves penetrate into the soft tissues of the problem area
  • Heat/ice packs – most commonly used modality to ease pain and promote relaxation
  • Electrical stimulation – to ease the sensation of pain,relax tight tissue and improve circulation
  • Light therapy (cold laser)   to promote repair of injured tissue at the cellular level
  • Mechanical traction – used to decrease joint pressure

Manual therapy techniques:

  • Myofascial release – soft tissue technique used to reset the resting tension of tight tissues
  • Joint mobilization – improves the gliding motion of the vertebrae
  • Muscle energy – form of gentle isometric contractions to relax the muscles

Active exercises physical therapists will use for LBP include:

  • Stretching – hamstring stretches are very important for LBP health, this is just one stretch to practice but is the most crucial
  • Strengthening – dynamic lumbar stabilization and core strengthening techniques are used to decrease LBP pain
  • Low-impact aerobic conditioning – this is important for long-term pain relief, examples of this are walking, biking or swimming 30-40 min up to 3 times weekly

Prevention and Best Practices

Here are some easy tips to keeping that lower back stable and able!

  • Posture – using proper body positioning at home, work and during any activity
  • Keep any weights/ heavier objects close to your body when doing a workout or lifting
  • Asking for help with heavy objects before attempting to lift them
  • Maintaining a regular physical fitness acumen

If you or someone you know suffers from lower back pain or has been experiencing recurring back pain it is important to contact your local Physical Therapist immediately to begin a healthy program that will get you back to doing what you love.

Flashback Friday with some training tips from UFC Fighter Myles “Fury” Jury

Over the years we have posted many subjects on our social media outlets from easy every day stretches to fitness articles and birthday pictures and team outings. One in particular stood out to us, a post from 2014, Dr. Lindy First’s patient UFC fight Myles “Fury” Jury and his video clip (see clip below) on … Continue reading “Flashback Friday with some training tips from UFC Fighter Myles “Fury” Jury”

Over the years we have posted many subjects on our social media outlets from easy every day stretches to fitness articles and birthday pictures and team outings. One in particular stood out to us, a post from 2014, Dr. Lindy First’s patient UFC fight Myles “Fury” Jury and his video clip (see clip below) on his training, regime and upcoming fight in Japan. This post was not only to showcase a patient, but it was to show dedication, perseverance and the pursuit of being driven to get to the main event. We are so proud of Myles and of each of our patients and the strength they show every day to work harder and to get better.

https://sports.yahoo.com/video/theshoot-myles-jury-050000064.html

Aging Successfully

What do five people ages 80, 86, 92, 93, and 94 all have in common? Read on to find out. Successful aging refers to the physical, mental, and social-well being in older age.  It can also be defined as absence of chronic disease and risk factors for disease, good health, and high levels of independent … Continue reading “Aging Successfully”

What do five people ages 80, 86, 92, 93, and 94 all have in common? Read on to find out.

Successful aging refers to the physical, mental, and social-well being in older age.  It can also be defined as absence of chronic disease and risk factors for disease, good health, and high levels of independent physical functioning, performance, mobility, and cognitive function.

So what does this mean? People who age successfully are resilient and motivated. They are able to deal with factors out of their control. They may have been dealt a bad hand, but they are optimistic and roll with the punches.  For example, a person who is diagnosed with Parkinson’s embraces the things they can do and works hard to overcome the difficult obstacles. They accept the diagnosis, but do not give in to it. They optimize their physical and mental abilities to be able to move on.

Successful aging also includes certain controllable factors such as eating a healthy diet, getting plenty of sleep, limiting alcohol consumption, and not smoking. I know what you are thinking, “Yikes I don’t get enough sleep” or “ I have been wanting to change my diet”, well it is never too late to start and now you have extra reason to stick to it.

Social well-being is a very important factor in aging and being happy as we enter our golden years. Staying active with family, friends, and in the community gives a sense of belonging and self worth. It can take effort, but the benefits will come back to you ten fold. We all want to feel needed and to have a purpose. Being active socially can help with these feelings.

Physical well-being includes keeping the mind and body strong. It is crucial to actively use your mind. Playing bridge and doing puzzles are known to help the synapses’ connect. But did you know exercises also make your brain turn on?  Physical activities can include a simple walk, gym exercises, swimming, and exercises to strengthen your arms, legs, and core muscles.  Balance training to decrease the risk of falls can also be included. Being active and staying strong builds self-confidence in your physical and mental abilities.  By staying active a person has a far greater chance of maintaining independence in living, mobility, and activities of daily living.

Physical therapy is a great asset when it comes to working on your physical, mental and social well-being. It offers programs to build strength and improve balance. Therapists can help problem-solve issues that may be limiting your independence.  It also provides balance training to decrease your risk of falls. Coming to a local therapist’s office also offers socialization.  Many clinics are full of people in your same situation.  It becomes a social outing when you meet new people and connect with others you met on a previous visit. And it can be FUN!

So what do these five people have in common?  They are all patients at an outpatient physical therapy clinic. They are all wonderfully young seniors working on strength, balance, and endurance so they can continue to drive, live independently, and avoid falls. The clinic is a community.  The seniors are an important part of that community.  While they are getting the physical activities, they are also receiving the mental and social stimuli needed to age successfully and continue their zest for life. Would you benefit from physical therapy? If so, make a call to Team IPT now at 619.260.0750 and schedule an evaluation today.

To Keep Your Balance You Must Keep Moving

Movement. The key to growing, an every day occurrence in any human’s life since birth. A baby kicks and squirms, a toddler crawls before walking, a kid learning to ride a bike. All movements that lead to balance strength. But with keeping that balance there can come falls. While a baby, child or young adult … Continue reading “To Keep Your Balance You Must Keep Moving”

Movement. The key to growing, an every day occurrence in any human’s life since birth. A baby kicks and squirms, a toddler crawls before walking, a kid learning to ride a bike. All movements that lead to balance strength.

But with keeping that balance there can come falls. While a baby, child or young adult can fall and sustain a minor injury, a fall for someone older can be detrimental and even fatal.

The NY Times posted an article stating that “ In 2010, 13 million Americans reported being injured in a fall, often caused by simple trips on the sidewalk or on the stairs at home. For the over 65s, the figures are worse: one in three in this age group falls every year, resulting in some 250,000 hip fractures and more than 25,000 deaths, usually from traumatic brain injuries. The health care cost of treating these falls is estimated to be $34 billion a year.”

With the rise of “falling” continuing how do we stop or at least prevent this?

Balance is both physical and mental. A lot of us can walk, run, skip, jump around without hesitation, but focused balance can be more challenging. Think of standing in a position on one leg for longer than thirty seconds…simple enough? Now close your eyes and try it again. Not so easy right?

Balance is defined as an individual’s ability to maintain their line of gravity within their base of support. Think of this definition as the physical action. The mental action of balance is maintaining equilibrium where all acting forces of one’s body and mind are cancelled by each other resulting in a stable balanced system.

What are some ways to regain that balance?

Standing Up Right – Each human has sensors in their muscles and tendons throughout their body that detect stretches and deformations. These are known as proprioceptors.

Your balance won’t be stable unless your brain is attuned to the signals from these sensors. Even wearing socks can interfere with this subtle feedback and may worsen your balance.

Walking – Everyday balance training. While it looks easy, it is a lot of mental balance for your brain to calculate where your feet should be placed to avoid a fall.

Gross Motor Skills – The movement and coordination of one’s arms and legs in coordinated skills like running, jumping, crawling. These can enhance your cognitive performance and strengthen your balance.

Physical Therapy- Improves mobility. Physical Therapy will help regain the ability to move around with more ease, coordination, and confidence. Creating an individualized treatment and exercise program to gradually build your strength and movement skills.

How to find the right balance?

By combining physical and cognitive movements together you can achieve balance. Simple balance training, aerobic exercise and strength training will physically build endurance and growth, but it is the coordination of the movements of your body through more unpredictable exercises that will enhance the cognitive movement in your balance.

For more information on balance and best balance practices please reach out to your IPT therapist.

Workplace Ergonomics

If you sit at a desk all day – these quick practices are for you! Set an alarm for every 30-45 minutes to get up and stretch!

If you sit at a desk all day – these quick practices are for you! Set an alarm for every 30-45 minutes to get up and stretch!

What is Manual Therapy and how can it help me?

A lot of patients mistakenly think physical therapy is just exercise programs and modality regimes for pain. Although both exercise and pain modalities are important pieces to a comprehensive physical therapy plan of care, manual therapy is proven to reduce recovery times, increase range of motion, and improve overall tissue mobility. Manual therapy is basically … Continue reading “What is Manual Therapy and how can it help me?”

A lot of patients mistakenly think physical therapy is just exercise programs and modality regimes for pain. Although both exercise and pain modalities are important pieces to a comprehensive physical therapy plan of care, manual therapy is proven to reduce recovery times, increase range of motion, and improve overall tissue mobility.

Manual therapy is basically different hands-on techniques that professionally trained physical therapist’s implement to relieve pain and restore mobility. Manual therapy includes different massage techniques and manipulating of soft tissue such as muscles, fascia, and connective tissues with the goal of increasing circulation, tissue mobility, reducing scar tissue, and relaxing  muscles, which ultimately can lead to reduced pain. Manual therapy can also include joint mobilization and manipulation, where the physical therapist uses specific, directed movements used to target joint restrictions and restore normal motion. These movements can loosen tight tissue around the targeted joints to improve flexibility, mobility, and pain. Manual therapy is typically used in conjunction with an individualized exercise program that will complement the gains made and restore function in the treated area.

Manual therapy is the foundational approach to any painful or stiff joint. There are no limitations on the joints that can be treated including your jaw (TMJ), spine, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, hip, knee, and ankle.

Techniques Used in Manual Therapy

  1. Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM) / Myofasical Release (MYR): While muscle tension is usually reduced when joint motion improves, the other surrounding tissues can still be affecting motion and causing pain. Soft tissue mobilization addresses muscle tension by moving tissue fluids, reducing tension, and breaking up fibrous or inelastic tissue such as scar tissue (also known as “myofascial adhesions”), through repetitive stretching and pressure.
  2. Strain-Counterstrain: With this technique, the physical therapist will place the target area in a position where the least pain is experienced for a couple minutes, while applying mild stretching. The patient is slowly brought out of the position, allowing the body to restore the muscles to their normal tension. This technique is suitable for those who are suffering from acute pain given the placement in an area of least amount of pain.
  3. Muscle Energy Techniques (METs): Muscle energy techniques are used to lengthen shortened muscles and move restricted joints. Unlike other manual therapy techniques, METs are an active technique, meaning the patient participates in the movement. The patient contracts their muscles for several seconds against a counterforce precisely applied by the physical therapist. This is repeated as the joint’s range of motion increases, but does not stress the joint.
  4. Joint Mobilization:  Joint mobilization is needed to increase range of motion and improve overall joint mechanics by slowly and painlessly moving the joint in ways that the patient is unable themselves thereby achieving decreased muscle tension and pain.
  5. High Velocity, Low Amplitude Thrusting: This procedure is the most effective at restoring joints that are restricted in movements in one direction. It involves taking the joint to the end of its range of motion, and providing a quick thrust in the same direction just beyond a joint’s range of motion. It is more aggressive than joint mobilizations, but does not move the joint beyond its anatomical limit.

Does Manual Therapy Hurt?

Manual therapy does not always hurt, however there is often some discomfort inherent in the process since the physical therapist is actively manipulating a painful or tight area. Before beginning manual therapy, physical therapist’s will have a consultation with the patient to understand their unique condition and baseline their current range of motion, strength and flexibility. Physical therapists will modify the amount of force they are using depending on the injury and if the pain is chronic, acute, or post-surgical. After treatment, patients may experience some soreness for a day or two, but usually report an immediate increase in range of motion and reduced pain levels.

4 Workstation Ergonomic Tips You Can Try Today

    You’ve probably heard of ergonomics – the study of efficiency and comfort in the workplace – but are you taking the right actions to make your workstation or home office as easy on your body as possible? If you work in an office environment, you can prevent pain and injury and work more … Continue reading “4 Workstation Ergonomic Tips You Can Try Today”

 

 

You’ve probably heard of ergonomics – the study of efficiency and comfort in the workplace – but are you taking the right actions to make your workstation or home office as easy on your body as possible? If you work in an office environment, you can prevent pain and injury and work more effectively when you carefully consider every aspect of your work situation, including these:

1. Your chair.

Start with a good chair that includes lumbar support, then sit with your hips as far back in the chair as possible. If the back angle is adjustable, aim for 100 to 110 degrees, ensuring that you have support for your upper back as well as your lower back. Inflatable cushions or pillows can help. Move arm rests down so that your shoulders are relaxed rather than supporting the weight of your upper body. If the armrests don’t adjust, consider removing them.

2. Your keyboard and mouse.

For the greatest comfort and to keep from straining muscles over time, place your keyboard directly in front of you, and make sure both your keyboard and mouse are close to your body so that reaching isn’t necessary. Adjust the height of your keyboard so that your elbows bend to about 100 to 110 degrees and definitely not less than 90 degrees. If you sit properly, you may find it comfortable to adjust your keyboard to tilt slightly away from you. A palm support can help maintain a health wrist position as long as it isn’t taller than the space bar. You may even want to consider a special split keyboard if it’s more comfortable for you.

3. Your monitor.

Your monitor should also be centered in front of you. But the viewable area should be located 2 to 3 inches above your seated eye level – much higher than most people place it. (Lower it a bit if you wear bifocals – or consider getting computer reading glasses.) Make sure the monitor is at least arm’s length away and out of any glare from windows or overhead lights. Use glare filters and task lights as necessary, and make sure your landline phone and documents are within arm’s length and easy to reach without straining.

4. Your work schedule.

Breaks are essential to good blood flow. No matter how carefully you design your workstation, staying in any one place too long will take a toll. You need to stretch every 20 to 30 minutes for at least a minute. If possible, do something other than your usual work for 5 to 10 minutes per hour. Try to get away from your desk at lunch and look around to rest and refocus your eyes. Take every opportunity possible to stand, move around, look in the distance and stretch. Cover your eyes with your hands periodically to allow your eyes to relax and your body to rest. It all makes a difference.

Whether you have pain or stiffness that has just started or troubling you for months from too much sitting, typing, or other close work, physical therapy can help.  If you need suggestions on setting up your work station at the office or at home, physical therapy has solutions for you.

We’re here when you need us at Innovative Physical Therapy!