Calculate Your Heart Rate

Continuing with National Heart Health Month, below you will find Dr. Lindy First’s video on how to calculate your heart rate and some exercise stats to keep your heart in good health. Since partnering up with  our friend, Kim Shapira M.S., R.D last month with her healthy eating challenge we want to encourage you to take … Continue reading “Calculate Your Heart Rate”

Continuing with National Heart Health Month, below you will find Dr. Lindy First’s video on how to calculate your heart rate and some exercise stats to keep your heart in good health. Since partnering up with  our friend, Kim Shapira M.S., R.D last month with her healthy eating challenge we want to encourage you to take care of your heart health and to follow Kim for more info on eating healthy for your heart!

Listen To Your Heart

February is National Heart Health Month. In this month’s newsletter we are going to share some stats on heart health, how to monitor your own heart rate, and explain how you and your Physical Therapist can improve your heart health. Heart Health Stats– courtesy of The Heart Foundation (www.theheartfoundation.org) Heart disease (which includes Heart Disease, … Continue reading “Listen To Your Heart”

February is National Heart Health Month. In this month’s newsletter we are going to share some stats on heart health, how to monitor your own heart rate, and explain how you and your Physical Therapist can improve your heart health.

Heart Health Stats– courtesy of The Heart Foundation (www.theheartfoundation.org)

  • Heart disease (which includes Heart Disease, Stroke and other Cardiovascular Diseases) is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States
  • Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease, killing nearly 380,000 people annually.
  • In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds. Every 60 seconds, someone in the United States dies from a heart disease-related event
  • Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women and is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined
  • 90% of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease or stroke.
  • Since 1984, more women than men have died each year from heart disease.

Monitoring Your Heart Rate

Normal Resting Heart Rate – Take your pulse for 15 seconds. To check your pulse over your carotid artery, place your index and third fingers on your neck to the side of your windpipe. …

Multiply this number by 4 to calculate your beats per minute.

Maximum Heart Rate (during exercise)-  is to subtract your age from 220. For example, if you’re 45 years old, subtract 45 from 220 to get a maximum heart rate of 175. This is the maximum number of times your heart should beat per minute during exercise.

Improve Your Heart Health

There are plenty of easy steps to improving your overall heart health, from taking daily walks, increasing your exercise regime, to drinking water.

The American College of Sports Medicine (ASCM) lists that, “Adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. Exercise recommendations can be met through 30-60 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (five days per week) or 20-60 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise (three days per week).”

The best tips to start improving your heart health today are:

  • Educating yourself on proper exercise procedures, and teach you how to self-monitor heart rate and exertion levels during exercise
  • Monitor your cardiac responses to exercise and activity by counting your heart rate or using one of the many health apps via your iPhone, Android or FitBit that can track not only your heart rate but your active calories and calories burned during exercise
  • Begin adopting independent exercise and activity into your daily routine- cardio, strength training, flexibility, resistance training and functional fitness training
  • Increase your exercise tolerance with the assistance of your physical therapist – ask your PT for exercises and at home routines to follow
  • Work with your physical therapist to create a tailored program of exercises including flexibility, strengthening and aerobic training

It is never too early to start thinking about this even now without having any cardiac problems. Preventive health planning will decrease your chances of having cardiac problems and increase your overall optimal health. Speak with your IPT therapist today to learn more.

New Year New You- Challenge Part 2!

Are you ready for part 2 of registered dietitian, Kim Shapira’s new year’s challenge? To refresh you, our January newsletter listed part 1 of Kim’s challenge: “The challenge for you is to change your mindset – let’s flip the idea that we want to lose weight to – let’s learn how to maintain a healthy … Continue reading “New Year New You- Challenge Part 2!”

Are you ready for part 2 of registered dietitian, Kim Shapira’s new year’s challenge? To refresh you, our January newsletter listed part 1 of Kim’s challenge:

“The challenge for you is to change your mindset – let’s flip the idea that we want to lose weight to – let’s learn how to maintain a healthy lifestyle and have a normal relationship with food! What if you made all your decisions from that place, as if you have already achieved weight loss? Would you make different choices? As you move through your day keep your intention close, and as you stand in the cross roads of all food choices (we make 225 a day) make your decisions from a healthy lifestyle stand point!” 

Part 2 of the New Year New You Challenge- Good Luck!!

New Year New You! Back to Basics: Healthy Eating

A healthy eating plan gives your body the nutrients it needs every day. Not only will a healthy eating plan result in weight loss, it will also lower your risk for heart disease and other health conditions. A healthy eating plan consists of a few key items: Fruits – 5-13 servings per day Veggies – … Continue reading “New Year New You! Back to Basics: Healthy Eating”

A healthy eating plan gives your body the nutrients it needs every day. Not only will a healthy eating plan result in weight loss, it will also lower your risk for heart disease and other health conditions.

A healthy eating plan consists of a few key items:

Fruits – 5-13 servings per day

Veggies – 5-13 servings per day

Protein – lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts

Healthy Fats – avocados, nut and seed butter, olives, flaxseed, salmon, tuna

Water – many health advisors, dietitians and nutrition authorities say you should drink half your body weight. For example if you weigh 150 pounds you should drink 75 ounces of water per day which equates to a little over 9 cups.

Emphasizing vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products into your diet is highly recommended.

To ensure a healthy balanced diet you will want to limit saturated and trans fats, sodium, and added sugars. Examples of these are fatty meats, cheese, cakes, breads, crackers and some dairy products.

Eating healthy is not the only thing that will ensure you a long-lasting and happy life, balancing that with exercise will also increase your life expectancy and keep you doing things you love!

The American Heart Association suggests 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. This breaks down to 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.

Sometimes though, it is not as easy as it seems. Only because we have engrained in our minds a specific weight loss number and focus solely on that. We need to switch our mindset to a positive outlook and plan that we can use daily in our lives.

With that said, we have a special Inside Innovative this week: 2018 Healthy Eating Challenge! We recently spoke with Kim Shapira M.S. and Registered Dietitian and are taking a page out of her playbook. Check out the Inside Innovative segment in the newsletter to learn more about Kim and to stay tuned for the video challenge and message from her coming in 2 weeks!

Team IPT Favorite Holiday Recipes!

This is a special posting for December. With the holidays quickly approaching we wanted to share two of our favorite holiday recipes with you to get you in the spirit! Holiday butter ball cookies and holiday latkes! Holiday Butter Ball Cookies Ingredients: 1 cup butter 4 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 tsp vanilla 2  1/4 cups … Continue reading “Team IPT Favorite Holiday Recipes!”

This is a special posting for December. With the holidays quickly approaching we wanted to share two of our favorite holiday recipes with you to get you in the spirit! Holiday butter ball cookies and holiday latkes!

Holiday Butter Ball Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup butter

4 tablespoons powdered sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2  1/4 cups sifted flour

1 cup chopped nuts (pick your favorite!)

Directions: Cream butter, add sugar and continue to beat until light. Add vanilla, sifted flour and mix well. Fold in chopped nuts. Shape into balls on an un-greased cookie sheet. Bake in oven at 350 degrees for 15-18 minutes. Roll in confectioner’s sugar while hot!

 

Holiday Latkes

Ingredients:

2-3 peeled medium potatoes

1 large egg

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 tsp of salt, flour and cooking oil

2 medium size frying pans

Directions: Grate potatoes, squeeze out the starchy liquid. Mix in the whisked egg, chopped onion, 1 tsp of sale and 1 tsp of flour. Add enough canola/vegetable oil to fill entire bottom of the pan and then some. When oil is pipping hot, take one large tablespoon of mixture and place into the pan and smooth it out to become somewhat rounded (like a pancake!). Leave for two minutes or until golden brown on the bottom and flip to the other side. Place latkes on thick paper towel to cool and dab off extra oil. Serve with a side of applesauce or sour cream and enjoy!

Let’s Talk about Lower Back Pain

Lower. Back. Pain. We all know it, we’ve all experienced it and we all want it to go away. At any given time 25% of people living in the United States have lower back pain (LBP). That is a quarter of the country, A QUARTER! While most pain subsides and goes away within days, some … Continue reading “Let’s Talk about Lower Back Pain”

Lower. Back. Pain.

We all know it, we’ve all experienced it and we all want it to go away. At any given time 25% of people living in the United States have lower back pain (LBP). That is a quarter of the country, A QUARTER! While most pain subsides and goes away within days, some LBP can return or progress and can seriously impact your everyday life and your skeletal health.

A majority of us will be able to relieve and conquer our LBP by practicing simple exercises, maintaining great posture and staying active. But when chronic or recurring lower back pain happens, doing those exercises can become difficult. This is where Physical Therapy comes into play and can be the help someone needs to achieve comfort and  to prevent their lower back pain from coming back.

Physical Therapy will use three approaches for the treatment of lower back pain:

  1. Modalities
  2. Manual Therapy
  3. Active therapeutic exercises

Modalities commonly used:

  • Ultrasound – a form of deep heating where sound waves penetrate into the soft tissues of the problem area
  • Heat/ice packs – most commonly used modality to ease pain and promote relaxation
  • Electrical stimulation – to ease the sensation of pain,relax tight tissue and improve circulation
  • Light therapy (cold laser)   to promote repair of injured tissue at the cellular level
  • Mechanical traction – used to decrease joint pressure

Manual therapy techniques:

  • Myofascial release – soft tissue technique used to reset the resting tension of tight tissues
  • Joint mobilization – improves the gliding motion of the vertebrae
  • Muscle energy – form of gentle isometric contractions to relax the muscles

Active exercises physical therapists will use for LBP include:

  • Stretching – hamstring stretches are very important for LBP health, this is just one stretch to practice but is the most crucial
  • Strengthening – dynamic lumbar stabilization and core strengthening techniques are used to decrease LBP pain
  • Low-impact aerobic conditioning – this is important for long-term pain relief, examples of this are walking, biking or swimming 30-40 min up to 3 times weekly

Prevention and Best Practices

Here are some easy tips to keeping that lower back stable and able!

  • Posture – using proper body positioning at home, work and during any activity
  • Keep any weights/ heavier objects close to your body when doing a workout or lifting
  • Asking for help with heavy objects before attempting to lift them
  • Maintaining a regular physical fitness acumen

If you or someone you know suffers from lower back pain or has been experiencing recurring back pain it is important to contact your local Physical Therapist immediately to begin a healthy program that will get you back to doing what you love.

Flashback Friday with some training tips from UFC Fighter Myles “Fury” Jury

Over the years we have posted many subjects on our social media outlets from easy every day stretches to fitness articles and birthday pictures and team outings. One in particular stood out to us, a post from 2014, Dr. Lindy First’s patient UFC fight Myles “Fury” Jury and his video clip (see clip below) on … Continue reading “Flashback Friday with some training tips from UFC Fighter Myles “Fury” Jury”

Over the years we have posted many subjects on our social media outlets from easy every day stretches to fitness articles and birthday pictures and team outings. One in particular stood out to us, a post from 2014, Dr. Lindy First’s patient UFC fight Myles “Fury” Jury and his video clip (see clip below) on his training, regime and upcoming fight in Japan. This post was not only to showcase a patient, but it was to show dedication, perseverance and the pursuit of being driven to get to the main event. We are so proud of Myles and of each of our patients and the strength they show every day to work harder and to get better.

https://sports.yahoo.com/video/theshoot-myles-jury-050000064.html

Aging Successfully

What do five people ages 80, 86, 92, 93, and 94 all have in common? Read on to find out. Successful aging refers to the physical, mental, and social-well being in older age.  It can also be defined as absence of chronic disease and risk factors for disease, good health, and high levels of independent … Continue reading “Aging Successfully”

What do five people ages 80, 86, 92, 93, and 94 all have in common? Read on to find out.

Successful aging refers to the physical, mental, and social-well being in older age.  It can also be defined as absence of chronic disease and risk factors for disease, good health, and high levels of independent physical functioning, performance, mobility, and cognitive function.

So what does this mean? People who age successfully are resilient and motivated. They are able to deal with factors out of their control. They may have been dealt a bad hand, but they are optimistic and roll with the punches.  For example, a person who is diagnosed with Parkinson’s embraces the things they can do and works hard to overcome the difficult obstacles. They accept the diagnosis, but do not give in to it. They optimize their physical and mental abilities to be able to move on.

Successful aging also includes certain controllable factors such as eating a healthy diet, getting plenty of sleep, limiting alcohol consumption, and not smoking. I know what you are thinking, “Yikes I don’t get enough sleep” or “ I have been wanting to change my diet”, well it is never too late to start and now you have extra reason to stick to it.

Social well-being is a very important factor in aging and being happy as we enter our golden years. Staying active with family, friends, and in the community gives a sense of belonging and self worth. It can take effort, but the benefits will come back to you ten fold. We all want to feel needed and to have a purpose. Being active socially can help with these feelings.

Physical well-being includes keeping the mind and body strong. It is crucial to actively use your mind. Playing bridge and doing puzzles are known to help the synapses’ connect. But did you know exercises also make your brain turn on?  Physical activities can include a simple walk, gym exercises, swimming, and exercises to strengthen your arms, legs, and core muscles.  Balance training to decrease the risk of falls can also be included. Being active and staying strong builds self-confidence in your physical and mental abilities.  By staying active a person has a far greater chance of maintaining independence in living, mobility, and activities of daily living.

Physical therapy is a great asset when it comes to working on your physical, mental and social well-being. It offers programs to build strength and improve balance. Therapists can help problem-solve issues that may be limiting your independence.  It also provides balance training to decrease your risk of falls. Coming to a local therapist’s office also offers socialization.  Many clinics are full of people in your same situation.  It becomes a social outing when you meet new people and connect with others you met on a previous visit. And it can be FUN!

So what do these five people have in common?  They are all patients at an outpatient physical therapy clinic. They are all wonderfully young seniors working on strength, balance, and endurance so they can continue to drive, live independently, and avoid falls. The clinic is a community.  The seniors are an important part of that community.  While they are getting the physical activities, they are also receiving the mental and social stimuli needed to age successfully and continue their zest for life. Would you benefit from physical therapy? If so, make a call to Team IPT now at 619.260.0750 and schedule an evaluation today.