April: Foot Health Awareness Month!

Did you know it is estimated that by the age of 70 the average person has walked approximately 26,000 miles?! Our feet take quite a beating which causes many changes in our foot structure and gait over time. With April being Foot Health Awareness Month, we want to talk about the most common foot and … Continue reading “April: Foot Health Awareness Month!”

Did you know it is estimated that by the age of 70 the average person has walked approximately 26,000 miles?! Our feet take quite a beating which causes many changes in our foot structure and gait over time. With April being Foot Health Awareness Month, we want to talk about the most common foot and ankle problems along with specific footwear that can aide with some of these problems.

  1. Plantar Fasciitis– an inflammation of the long band of connective tissue running from the heel to the ball of the foot. Heel spurs are bony overgrowths on the heel bone. Painful steps first thing in the morning are common to 83.5 % of patients with plantar fasciitis or heel spur
  2. Achilles Tendinitis-an irritation and inflammation of the tendon that attaches to the back of the heel bone
  3. Ankle Sprains– Most common injury caused by activity. Walking, jogging, running along uneven surfaces and sports can cause this injury
  4. Bunions– an enlargement at the base of the big toe, caused by a misalignment of the joint. They tend to be hereditary, but can be aggravated by shoes that are too narrow in the forefoot
  5. Athlete’s Foot and Onychomycosis– Athlete’s foot is a common infection of the skin characterized by itching, scaling, redness and the formation of small blisters. Onychomycosis is a nail fungus causing thickened, brittle, crumbly, or ragged nails, which can start from Athlete’s Foot
  6. Hammertoes– these are hereditary skeletal issues, affecting any toe on the foot
  7. Flat Foot/Fallen Arches– a structural deformity that causes the lowering of the arch of the foot. Painful fallen arches or high arches may need treatment such as custom orthotics or surgery. People with flat feet may have ankle, knee or low back pain
  8. Neuroma-an enlarged benign growth of nerves, commonly between the third and fourth toes. This can result in pain, burning, tingling or numbness between the toes and in the ball of the foot. Poorly fitting shoes, high heels, trauma and heredity can all be causes

Shoes – What to Avoid and What to Wear

The obvious shoes to avoid- high heels (stilettos), tall wedges, very flat shoes with little to no support. The obvious shoes to wear- sneakers, or shoes with a cushion/support. If you cannot avoid a heel, look for something no higher than 2 inches. Chose a lace up shoe versus a slip on. Avoid plastic or vinyl shoes and opt for something more breathable. A flexible sole in a shoe is important so it allows your toes to bend when you walk.

How do You Find the Right Shoes?

  • Try shoes on at the end of the day when your feet are at the largest they will be
  • If you own orthotics make sure to bring those with you
  • Ignore sizing and pay attention to how your foot actually feels
  • There should be a 1/2 inch space from the end of your longest toe to the end of the shoe
  • Walk around the store in them

If you are experiencing any of the above foot/ankle problems or have some concerns please contact your physical therapist, doctor or local podiatrist for more information.

A New Take on an Old Technique Video Demo!

Check out our video demo of IASTM- instrumented soft tissue mobilization and the techniques we use to release muscle knots and scar tissue.

Check out our video demo of IASTM- instrumented soft tissue mobilization and the techniques we use to release muscle knots and scar tissue.

Ergonomic Tips for Driving

Sitting posture is an important component to avoid or manage neck and back problems. Prolonged sitting, especially in a car, is a common cause of spinal pain. Proper adjustment of your car seat can make a big difference in your comfort while commuting to work and your other activities. To Adjust the Car Seat: Sit … Continue reading “Ergonomic Tips for Driving”

Sitting posture is an important component to avoid or manage neck and back problems. Prolonged sitting, especially in a car, is a common cause of spinal pain. Proper adjustment of your car seat can make a big difference in your comfort while commuting to work and your other activities.

To Adjust the Car Seat:

  1. Sit all the way back into the seat, approximating your buttock with the back rest.
  2. Adjust the seat height as high as possible so your hips are at least as high as your knees. Be sure you can see the road and instruments.
  3. Tilt your seat forward to make the seat horizontal or tilted slightly downward.  This will help to raise the hips to equal or higher than the knees and decrease pressure on your spine.
  4. Adjust the seat forward so you can reach and completely depress the foot pedals without your back moving away from the seat. Your elbows should be bent when hands are placed on the steering wheel. Having to reach to the steering wheel increases the pressure on the lumbar spine and can cause stress in the neck, shoulders, and wrists.
  5. Your feet should be relaxed with your heels on the floor and the balls of your feet able to press the pedals.  The left foot should be placed on the footrest whenever you are not using the clutch (if driving a manual transmission) as this increases the support to both your pelvis and back.
  6. The back of your seat should be inclined to an angle of 100-110 degrees.
  7. Most cars have an adjustable lumbar support.  Adjust this cushion to fill the gap between the seat and your lower back.  You can use a rolled towel or small pillow if the car does not have a built-in support.

Adjusting your car seat can really make a positive difference. The correct seat position will make you and your spine much happier.

A New Take on an Old Technique

Keeping up on all the latest techniques, last month two of IPT’s physical therapists, Jennifer Muir and Dr. Jared Brown attended a technique course on Instrumented Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization. What is it? – IASTM has come to mean any type of tool assisted massage. It is a manual therapy technique using specially designed instruments … Continue reading “A New Take on an Old Technique”

Keeping up on all the latest techniques, last month two of IPT’s physical therapists, Jennifer Muir and Dr. Jared Brown attended a technique course on Instrumented Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization.

What is it? – IASTM has come to mean any type of tool assisted massage. It is a manual therapy technique using specially designed instruments to release tight tissue (muscle knots) and adhesions (scar tissue). IASTM has recently become a popular technique but has been used in western medicine since the mid 90’s and has actually been around for thousands of years evolving from a Chinese medicine technique called Gua Sha.

What does it do? – There are four ways IASTM affects tissue and the healing process

1. Neurophysiological effects – stimulates the nervous system, initiating

the natural healing process of tissue

2. Mechanotransduction – mechanical stimulus using pressure to affect biological change and tissue repair

3. Breaking of Cross-Links – releases fascial restrictions

4. Fluid dynamics – improves circulation, reduces swelling

Why choose IASTM?

Studies are showing immediate improvements in range of motion, strength and pain perception following treatment. IASTM is commonly used for soft-tissue injuries involving muscles, tendons, and ligaments such as strains and sprains.  Great for chronic conditions (ie achilles tendonitis, tennis elbow, hamstring strains, IT band syndrome) IASTM can have great immediate results to regaining mobility, improving tissue tension, speeding up the healing process and returning to sports faster.

Next time you are at Innovative Physical Therapy ask about IASTM, give it a try and see the results!

Calculate Your Heart Rate

Continuing with National Heart Health Month, below you will find Dr. Lindy First’s video on how to calculate your heart rate and some exercise stats to keep your heart in good health. Since partnering up with  our friend, Kim Shapira M.S., R.D last month with her healthy eating challenge we want to encourage you to take … Continue reading “Calculate Your Heart Rate”

Continuing with National Heart Health Month, below you will find Dr. Lindy First’s video on how to calculate your heart rate and some exercise stats to keep your heart in good health. Since partnering up with  our friend, Kim Shapira M.S., R.D last month with her healthy eating challenge we want to encourage you to take care of your heart health and to follow Kim for more info on eating healthy for your heart!

Listen To Your Heart

February is National Heart Health Month. In this month’s newsletter we are going to share some stats on heart health, how to monitor your own heart rate, and explain how you and your Physical Therapist can improve your heart health. Heart Health Stats– courtesy of The Heart Foundation (www.theheartfoundation.org) Heart disease (which includes Heart Disease, … Continue reading “Listen To Your Heart”

February is National Heart Health Month. In this month’s newsletter we are going to share some stats on heart health, how to monitor your own heart rate, and explain how you and your Physical Therapist can improve your heart health.

Heart Health Stats– courtesy of The Heart Foundation (www.theheartfoundation.org)

  • Heart disease (which includes Heart Disease, Stroke and other Cardiovascular Diseases) is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States
  • Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease, killing nearly 380,000 people annually.
  • In the United States, someone has a heart attack every 34 seconds. Every 60 seconds, someone in the United States dies from a heart disease-related event
  • Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women and is more deadly than all forms of cancer combined
  • 90% of women have one or more risk factors for developing heart disease or stroke.
  • Since 1984, more women than men have died each year from heart disease.

Monitoring Your Heart Rate

Normal Resting Heart Rate – Take your pulse for 15 seconds. To check your pulse over your carotid artery, place your index and third fingers on your neck to the side of your windpipe. …

Multiply this number by 4 to calculate your beats per minute.

Maximum Heart Rate (during exercise)-  is to subtract your age from 220. For example, if you’re 45 years old, subtract 45 from 220 to get a maximum heart rate of 175. This is the maximum number of times your heart should beat per minute during exercise.

Improve Your Heart Health

There are plenty of easy steps to improving your overall heart health, from taking daily walks, increasing your exercise regime, to drinking water.

The American College of Sports Medicine (ASCM) lists that, “Adults should get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per week. Exercise recommendations can be met through 30-60 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise (five days per week) or 20-60 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise (three days per week).”

The best tips to start improving your heart health today are:

  • Educating yourself on proper exercise procedures, and teach you how to self-monitor heart rate and exertion levels during exercise
  • Monitor your cardiac responses to exercise and activity by counting your heart rate or using one of the many health apps via your iPhone, Android or FitBit that can track not only your heart rate but your active calories and calories burned during exercise
  • Begin adopting independent exercise and activity into your daily routine- cardio, strength training, flexibility, resistance training and functional fitness training
  • Increase your exercise tolerance with the assistance of your physical therapist – ask your PT for exercises and at home routines to follow
  • Work with your physical therapist to create a tailored program of exercises including flexibility, strengthening and aerobic training

It is never too early to start thinking about this even now without having any cardiac problems. Preventive health planning will decrease your chances of having cardiac problems and increase your overall optimal health. Speak with your IPT therapist today to learn more.

New Year New You- Challenge Part 2!

Are you ready for part 2 of registered dietitian, Kim Shapira’s new year’s challenge? To refresh you, our January newsletter listed part 1 of Kim’s challenge: “The challenge for you is to change your mindset – let’s flip the idea that we want to lose weight to – let’s learn how to maintain a healthy … Continue reading “New Year New You- Challenge Part 2!”

Are you ready for part 2 of registered dietitian, Kim Shapira’s new year’s challenge? To refresh you, our January newsletter listed part 1 of Kim’s challenge:

“The challenge for you is to change your mindset – let’s flip the idea that we want to lose weight to – let’s learn how to maintain a healthy lifestyle and have a normal relationship with food! What if you made all your decisions from that place, as if you have already achieved weight loss? Would you make different choices? As you move through your day keep your intention close, and as you stand in the cross roads of all food choices (we make 225 a day) make your decisions from a healthy lifestyle stand point!” 

Part 2 of the New Year New You Challenge- Good Luck!!

New Year New You! Back to Basics: Healthy Eating

A healthy eating plan gives your body the nutrients it needs every day. Not only will a healthy eating plan result in weight loss, it will also lower your risk for heart disease and other health conditions. A healthy eating plan consists of a few key items: Fruits – 5-13 servings per day Veggies – … Continue reading “New Year New You! Back to Basics: Healthy Eating”

A healthy eating plan gives your body the nutrients it needs every day. Not only will a healthy eating plan result in weight loss, it will also lower your risk for heart disease and other health conditions.

A healthy eating plan consists of a few key items:

Fruits – 5-13 servings per day

Veggies – 5-13 servings per day

Protein – lean meats, poultry, fish, beans, eggs and nuts

Healthy Fats – avocados, nut and seed butter, olives, flaxseed, salmon, tuna

Water – many health advisors, dietitians and nutrition authorities say you should drink half your body weight. For example if you weigh 150 pounds you should drink 75 ounces of water per day which equates to a little over 9 cups.

Emphasizing vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products into your diet is highly recommended.

To ensure a healthy balanced diet you will want to limit saturated and trans fats, sodium, and added sugars. Examples of these are fatty meats, cheese, cakes, breads, crackers and some dairy products.

Eating healthy is not the only thing that will ensure you a long-lasting and happy life, balancing that with exercise will also increase your life expectancy and keep you doing things you love!

The American Heart Association suggests 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week. This breaks down to 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week.

Sometimes though, it is not as easy as it seems. Only because we have engrained in our minds a specific weight loss number and focus solely on that. We need to switch our mindset to a positive outlook and plan that we can use daily in our lives.

With that said, we have a special Inside Innovative this week: 2018 Healthy Eating Challenge! We recently spoke with Kim Shapira M.S. and Registered Dietitian and are taking a page out of her playbook. Check out the Inside Innovative segment in the newsletter to learn more about Kim and to stay tuned for the video challenge and message from her coming in 2 weeks!

Team IPT Favorite Holiday Recipes!

This is a special posting for December. With the holidays quickly approaching we wanted to share two of our favorite holiday recipes with you to get you in the spirit! Holiday butter ball cookies and holiday latkes! Holiday Butter Ball Cookies Ingredients: 1 cup butter 4 tablespoons powdered sugar 1 tsp vanilla 2  1/4 cups … Continue reading “Team IPT Favorite Holiday Recipes!”

This is a special posting for December. With the holidays quickly approaching we wanted to share two of our favorite holiday recipes with you to get you in the spirit! Holiday butter ball cookies and holiday latkes!

Holiday Butter Ball Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup butter

4 tablespoons powdered sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2  1/4 cups sifted flour

1 cup chopped nuts (pick your favorite!)

Directions: Cream butter, add sugar and continue to beat until light. Add vanilla, sifted flour and mix well. Fold in chopped nuts. Shape into balls on an un-greased cookie sheet. Bake in oven at 350 degrees for 15-18 minutes. Roll in confectioner’s sugar while hot!

 

Holiday Latkes

Ingredients:

2-3 peeled medium potatoes

1 large egg

1/4 cup chopped onion

1 tsp of salt, flour and cooking oil

2 medium size frying pans

Directions: Grate potatoes, squeeze out the starchy liquid. Mix in the whisked egg, chopped onion, 1 tsp of sale and 1 tsp of flour. Add enough canola/vegetable oil to fill entire bottom of the pan and then some. When oil is pipping hot, take one large tablespoon of mixture and place into the pan and smooth it out to become somewhat rounded (like a pancake!). Leave for two minutes or until golden brown on the bottom and flip to the other side. Place latkes on thick paper towel to cool and dab off extra oil. Serve with a side of applesauce or sour cream and enjoy!