Learn a Proper TRX Row in 17 Seconds

Did you know that swimming is a low-impact exercise that manages to work every muscle in the body?! That’s part of why we love it so much, but that doesn’t mean it’s 100% safe.

Strength training to the rotator cuff, scapular stabilizers, and core muscles will enable a more powerful and safe stroke, and TRX rows are a great way to do that!

Watch this video from Dr. Maya Bizik where she shows how to strengthen these muscles with TRX rows.

  • TRX Bent Knee Row
    • Complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions
    • Starting position: hang shoulder under handles with arms straight, back and hips straight with knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
    • Movement: Pull body up so sides of chest make contact with handles while keeping the body straight. Return until arms are extended straight and shoulders are stretched forward. Repeat as directed.

References:

1. Tovin BJ. Prevention and treatment of swimmer’s shoulder. N Am J Sports Phys Ther. 2006;1:166–175.

2. Improving your front crawl technique. Swimming.org website. Published on November 24, 2014. Accessed October 22, 2020.

If you need more help maintaining injury prevention, inquire about our virtual classes or virtual 1 on 1 physical therapy and wellness services (exercise training also available!) Call (619) 260-0750 today!

5 Tips for Preventing Injury During Swimming

Swimming is a low-impact exercise that works all the muscles in the body. Even though swimming is the preferred type of exercise to maintain fitness and rehabilitate certain injuries, there is still a risk of swimming injuries, commonly shoulder injuries, if you are not using the proper swim stroke technique.

Here are some key components to consider when swimming:

  1. Bilateral Breathing This is the ability to breathe comfortably on both sides resulting in equalizing muscle development and symmetry
  2. Posture Tightness in chest musculature or rounded shoulders can put you at risk for shoulder impingement
  3. Kick Your kick should originate from the hips with a slight bend in the knee at all times.
  4. Catch and Pull “Catch” is when hand enters the water and your thumb should NOT enter the water first to prevent internal rotation at the shoulder. “Pull” is the sweeping phase when arm pulls through the water to move the body forward. During the “pull”, the arm should NOT cross midline or reach out too wide.
  5. Body Rotation I.e. as the right arm enters the water, the body should rotate slightly toward the left and vice versa.

In addition to the above tips mentioned, strength training to the rotator cuff, scapular stabilizers and core muscles will enable a more powerful and efficient stroke.

  • TRX Bent Knee Row
    • Complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions
    • Starting position: hang shoulder under handles with arms straight, back and hips straight with knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
    • Movement: Pull body up so sides of chest make contact with handles while keeping the body straight. Return until arms are extended straight and shoulders are stretched forward. Repeat as directed.
TRX bent knee row
  • Shoulder Extension with Theraband (Speed Skiers)
    • Complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions
    • Starting position: Anchor an elastic band to a secure object at top of the door. Grab ahold of both ends of the exercise band and place your arms straight out in front of you.
    • Movement: Extend your arms backward while keeping your elbows straight and squeezing your shoulder blades down and back. Return to the starting position. Repeat as directed.
Shoulder extension with theraband
  • Medicine Ball Slams
    • Complete 3 sets of 10 repetitions
    • Starting position: standing with a medicine ball in both hands.
    • Movement: Take medicine ball overhead, slam straight down, catch the ball, and repeat.
    • Tip: Stance may be a little wider than normal.
Medicine ball slams
  • Shoulder Internal Rotation with Resistance Band
    • Complete 3 sets of 12-15 repetitions
    • Starting Position: Begin by placing an exercise band at chest height securely in a door jam.  Standing perpendicular to the doorway with the arm you wish to exercise closest to the doorway.  Place a towel roll between your elbow and your side and bend the elbow to be exercised to 90 degrees. 
    • Movement: Slowly bring your hand towards your stomach, keeping your elbow bent and arm at your side.  Repeat as directed.
Shoulder External Rotation with resistance band
  • Shoulder External Rotation with Resistance Band
    • Complete 3 sets of 12-15 repetitions
    • Starting Position: Begin by placing an exercise band at chest height securely in a door jam. ­Standing perpendicular to the doorway with the arm you wish to exercise furthest from the doorway. ­ Place a towel roll between your elbow and your side and bend the elbow to be exercised to 90 degrees. ­
    • Movement: Slowly pull the band away from you, keeping your elbow bent and upper arm at your side. ­ Repeat as directed.
Shoulder External Rotation with resistance band
  • Pectoralis stretch
    • Hold the stretch for 30 seconds and complete 3 sets
    • Starting position: Begin standing with a doorway about 1-2 feet in front of you.  Bend the elbows of both arms to 90 degrees, raise both arms so the upper arms are parallel to the floor, and place your forearms on either side of the doorway. 
    • Movement: Step forward with one foot so that it’s on the other side of the doorway.  Slowly shift weight onto the front foot until you feel a stretch in your chest. Hold as indicated.
Pectoralis stretch

References:

1. Tovin BJ. Prevention and treatment of swimmer’s shoulder. N Am J Sports Phys Ther. 2006;1:166–175.

2. Improving your front crawl technique. Swimming.org website. Published on November 24, 2014. Accessed October 22, 2020.

If you need more help maintaining injury prevention, inquire about our virtual classes or virtual 1 on 1 physical therapy and wellness services (exercise training also available!) Call (619) 260-0750 today!